Food and agriculture co-education experience between parents and children The circle of cooperation is widespread throughout the region

Food and agriculture co-education experience between parents and children The circle of cooperation is widespread across the region

Human resource development through agriculture and food education

In response to the voices of parents wanting to give children the opportunity to experience agriculture, a volunteer activity called “Agri-Challenge” began in 2012. It was planned and run by An executive committee is made up of members such as Kushiro School students of Hokkaido Pedagogical University and parents raising children living in Kushiro City. The opportunity for parents and children to learn “the importance of food” through “food and agriculture education,” integrating food education and learning from farming experiences, is human resource development. students, who will stand in the field of future education, and administration and citizenship. It also functions as a place of cooperation.

Enthusiastically guides students to convey the charms of agriculture

The subjects of “Agri-Challenge” are parents and children living in Kushiro City. In 2017, 20 families were registered. In operations approximately 20 times a year, we are developing initial programs that utilize local resources, such as experience growing on university farms and making miso. In our “Let’s do konnyaku” activity conducted in September 2017, we challenged to make konnyaku using konnyaku potatoes harvested on university farm. All the students who played a central role in the second grade of the Japanese Agriculture Test, asked them “Konnyaku potatoes are pink”, “Do you know how many years it took to make konnyaku potatoes? ? ” Is received. While grasping the basics of agriculture, cutting the potatoes into small pieces, there is also one action that makes children “itchy” is to touch the potato directly.

Every completed konnyaku has been brought home. The kids who tasted the konjac at home enjoyed the unique handcrafted texture.
One of the students who taught how to make the konjac said, “A child without a knuckle was able to make good use of the knuckles and feel growth.” For those who aim to become teachers of the future, this is also where they can experience food and food education and agriculture practices throughout the year. The parents who have been involved in this activity for the second year in a row say, “It seems you are going through a lot of difficulty farming through your experience. I want you to remember the importance of food even. adulthood.”


Food and agriculture co-education experience between parents and children The circle of cooperation is widespread across the region

Human resource development through agriculture and food education

In response to the voices of parents wanting to give children the opportunity to experience agriculture, a volunteer activity called “Agri-Challenge” began in 2012. It was planned and run by An executive committee is made up of members such as Kushiro School students of Hokkaido Pedagogical University and parents raising children living in Kushiro City. The opportunity for parents and children to learn “the importance of food” through “food and agriculture education,” integrating food education and learning from farming experiences, is human resource development. students, who will stand in the field of future education, and administration and citizenship. It also functions as a place of cooperation.

Enthusiastically guides students to convey the charms of agriculture

The subjects of “Agri-Challenge” are parents and children living in Kushiro City. In 2017, 20 families were registered. In operations approximately 20 times a year, we are developing initial programs that utilize local resources, such as experience growing on university farms and making miso. In our “Let’s do konnyaku” activity conducted in September 2017, we challenged to make konnyaku using konnyaku potatoes harvested on university farm. All the students who played a central role in the second grade of the Japanese Agriculture Test, asked them “Konnyaku potatoes are pink”, “Do you know how many years it took to make konnyaku potatoes? ? ” Is received. While grasping the basics of agriculture, cutting the potatoes into small pieces, there is also one action that makes children “itchy” is to touch the potato directly.

Every completed konnyaku has been brought home. The kids who tasted the konjac at home enjoyed the unique handcrafted texture.
One of the students who taught how to make the konjac said, “A child without a knuckle was able to make good use of the knuckles and feel growth.” For those who aim to become teachers of the future, this is also where they can experience food and food education and agriculture practices throughout the year. The parents who have been involved in this activity for the second year in a row say, “It seems you are going through a lot of difficulty farming through your experience. I want you to remember the importance of food even. adulthood.”