A storm in the Sun in 2012 almost “turned off” the Earth

The world as we know it almost came to an end in 2012. One of the largest solar storms ever recorded nearly sent a stream of energy through Earth’s orbit that could destroy electrical systems across the planet. Had it happened just a week earlier, the Earth would have been affected. It was the strongest solar storm in 150 years, and passed through Earth’s orbit on July 23, 2012.

“If it had hit us, we still wouldn’t have recovered from it,” Daniel Baker of the Atmospheric and Space Physics Laboratory at the University of Colorado said in a NASA statement.

The sun turned enough on Sunday, which caused the high-energy particles to miss our planet.

“Fortunately, instead of the Earth, the solar cloud hit the STEREO probe, an observatory that is almost perfectly equipped to measure the parameters of such events,” Baker added.

Scientists recently analyzed in detail the data collected by the probe and concluded that the effects of the storm would be similar to the strongest ever recorded. It is about the so-called Carrington’s event in 1859, when telegraph systems throughout Europe and the United States failed. Some telegraphists then suffered an electric shock, and aurora borealis was seen all the way to Cuba and Hawaii.

If we found ourselves in a solar storm, we would first be hit by a wave of radiation, and then a magnetized plasma would appear that would do enormous damage. The storm would cause huge damage to the economy of the entire Earth and it would take a large number of years for the damage to be repaired to some extent. Fortunately for us, it bypassed our planet.

Had the storm hit the planet, it would have disabled the use of power sources, radio and GPS systems and would have disabled anything that ‘plugs into the wall’. The storm could also have resulted in the inability to supply drinking water to cities around the world.

The National Academy of Sciences calculated that we were hit by solar electricity that day, the impact on the economy would be two trillion dollars, more precisely, 20 times more than “cost” Hurricane Katrina.

Physicist Pete Riley warns that, based on the analysis of data on solar storms in the last 50 years, it can be calculated that the probability of being hit by a storm of similar strength in the next 10 years is 12 percent.

“It’s a worrying number,” Riley said.

The world as we know it almost came to an end in 2012. One of the largest solar storms ever recorded nearly sent a stream of energy through Earth’s orbit that could destroy electrical systems across the planet. Had it happened just a week earlier, the Earth would have been affected. It was the strongest solar storm in 150 years, and passed through Earth’s orbit on July 23, 2012.

“If it had hit us, we still wouldn’t have recovered from it,” Daniel Baker of the Atmospheric and Space Physics Laboratory at the University of Colorado said in a NASA statement.

The sun turned enough on Sunday, which caused the high-energy particles to miss our planet.

“Fortunately, instead of the Earth, the solar cloud hit the STEREO probe, an observatory that is almost perfectly equipped to measure the parameters of such events,” Baker added.

Scientists recently analyzed in detail the data collected by the probe and concluded that the effects of the storm would be similar to the strongest ever recorded. It is about the so-called Carrington’s event in 1859, when telegraph systems throughout Europe and the United States failed. Some telegraphists then suffered an electric shock, and aurora borealis was seen all the way to Cuba and Hawaii.

If we found ourselves in a solar storm, we would first be hit by a wave of radiation, and then a magnetized plasma would appear that would do enormous damage. The storm would cause huge damage to the economy of the entire Earth and it would take a large number of years for the damage to be repaired to some extent. Fortunately for us, it bypassed our planet.

Had the storm hit the planet, it would have disabled the use of power sources, radio and GPS systems and would have disabled anything that ‘plugs into the wall’. The storm could also have resulted in the inability to supply drinking water to cities around the world.

The National Academy of Sciences calculated that we were hit by solar electricity that day, the impact on the economy would be two trillion dollars, more precisely, 20 times more than “cost” Hurricane Katrina.

Physicist Pete Riley warns that, based on the analysis of data on solar storms in the last 50 years, it can be calculated that the probability of being hit by a storm of similar strength in the next 10 years is 12 percent.

“It’s a worrying number,” Riley said.