Do spiders have personalities?

Many social insects, such as ants, bees, or termites, form colonies that are divided into castes according to the tasks their members perform.

Also, a large number of animals are social, but in their castes, the inhabitants do not differ anatomically depending on what their task is.

Environmentalists at the University of Pittsburgh have studied a species of hairy spider (Anelosimus studiosus) from the teridide family, which lives across America, from New England to northern Argentina. They live in colonies, hunt together, share cobwebs and prey, have guards who keep eggs and feed the young with chewed food.

During the research, they noticed that there are two types of females, aggressive and tame. No matter that they hunt and protect the colony from attackers, they share their catch with others.

To examine this behavior, the scientists made an experiment in which 141 aggressive and 148 tame spiders had to use their attacking traits. The aggressive ones have been shown to be twice as good at hunting and netting, while the tame ones are almost three times better at keeping the cubs.

“The result of this experiment is that individuals can greatly influence the distribution of labor in the colony, and further research will be based on what causes differences in these species,” said study lead author Colin Wright.

pauk, Foto: Shutterstock

Many social insects, such as ants, bees, or termites, form colonies that are divided into castes according to the tasks their members perform.

Also, a large number of animals are social, but in their castes, the inhabitants do not differ anatomically depending on what their task is.

Environmentalists at the University of Pittsburgh have studied a species of hairy spider (Anelosimus studiosus) from the teridide family, which lives across America, from New England to northern Argentina. They live in colonies, hunt together, share cobwebs and prey, have guards who keep eggs and feed the young with chewed food.

During the research, they noticed that there are two types of females, aggressive and tame. No matter that they hunt and protect the colony from attackers, they share their catch with others.

To examine this behavior, the scientists made an experiment in which 141 aggressive and 148 tame spiders had to use their attacking traits. The aggressive ones have been shown to be twice as good at hunting and netting, while the tame ones are almost three times better at keeping the cubs.

“The result of this experiment is that individuals can greatly influence the distribution of labor in the colony, and further research will be based on what causes differences in these species,” said study lead author Colin Wright.