GameStop hinders Robinhood IPO

Crisis sparked by retail rebellion has left IPO on the back burner

A Gamestop establishment.

During the last few months, the Robinhood Markets platform rubbed its hands in the face of its IPO, public offer of sale. The lockdown had brought thousands of Americans who wanted to enter the stock market closer to the platform.

The IPO was set for May, according to sources from the company itself, which is collected by Bloomberg. Timing was key, since the arrival of vaccines could put the company in check once its clients regained their pre-pandemic plans.

Nevertheless, Robinhood is now in the middle of a storm after last week capped betting on a list of volatile stocks that GameStop itself was on.


Customers raised their voices in protest and lawmakers and regulators were forced to commit to scrutinizing Robinhood’s decisions.

IPO can be your salvation

These decisions at GamesStop can put your business in jeopardy. As such, the company intends the IPO to capitalize on its rapid growth last year, and offer profit potential for investors who supported it during this minor crisis.

Robinhood has been planning a May debut since at least the end of last year, according to people familiar with the matter. While that plan did not change, the company has yet to make a final decision on the date, so it could still be adjusted.

Executives have been so focused on dealing with the current crisis in recent days that publicizing its IPO date has not been a top priority.

Initial boost

Successful market debuts are often a matter of finding the right momentum for the investing public, and right now, Robinhood has that in abundance.

The company registered millions of users after the pandemic blocked economic activity, leaving people to find other ways to earn extra money while spending time at home.

On the other hand, the costs have not yet reached their maximum since it is still assembling the customer service, legal and compliance department.

For now, the number of new clients registered by the platform may be attractive to public investors willing to bet that Robinhood can use the funds to mature as a business.

Limit operations

But the atmosphere has become rarefied with the retail hordes challenging the power of Wall Street. Therefore, Robinhood will continue to restrict trading in listed shares still vulnerable to a ‘short squeeze’ after days of great volatility.

This list, of course, is headed by GameStop, from which users will only be able to buy one share and a maximum of five options contracts.

Crisis sparked by retail rebellion has left IPO on the back burner


A Gamestop establishment.

During the last few months, the Robinhood Markets platform rubbed its hands in the face of its IPO, public offer of sale. The lockdown had brought thousands of Americans who wanted to enter the stock market closer to the platform.

The IPO was set for May, according to sources from the company itself, which is collected by Bloomberg. Timing was key, since the arrival of vaccines could put the company in check once its clients regained their pre-pandemic plans.

Nevertheless, Robinhood is now in the middle of a storm after last week capped betting on a list of volatile stocks that GameStop itself was on.


Customers raised their voices in protest and lawmakers and regulators were forced to commit to scrutinizing Robinhood’s decisions.

IPO can be your salvation

These decisions at GamesStop can put your business in jeopardy. As such, the company intends the IPO to capitalize on its rapid growth last year, and offer profit potential for investors who supported it during this minor crisis.

Robinhood has been planning a May debut since at least the end of last year, according to people familiar with the matter. While that plan did not change, the company has yet to make a final decision on the date, so it could still be adjusted.

Executives have been so focused on dealing with the current crisis in recent days that publicizing its IPO date has not been a top priority.

Initial boost

Successful market debuts are often a matter of finding the right momentum for the investing public, and right now, Robinhood has that in abundance.

The company registered millions of users after the pandemic blocked economic activity, leaving people to find other ways to earn extra money while spending time at home.

On the other hand, the costs have not yet reached their maximum since it is still assembling the customer service, legal and compliance department.

For now, the number of new clients registered by the platform may be attractive to public investors willing to bet that Robinhood can use the funds to mature as a business.

Limit operations

But the atmosphere has become rarefied with the retail hordes challenging the power of Wall Street. Therefore, Robinhood will continue to restrict trading in listed shares still vulnerable to a ‘short squeeze’ after days of great volatility.

This list, of course, is headed by GameStop, from which users will only be able to buy one share and a maximum of five options contracts.